The Treehouse – Chapter IV

By Jake Kale

The bus turns left into Kenlis Road, and I have to ride a short distance down the road until it reaches the next stop. There I get off, and I consider going to have a look round my old school. But that would only be putting off the inevitable.

I start walking back towards Easton Avenue, then cross over as I make my way to the cemetery that I have steadfastly avoided my entire adult life. I don’t even bother to check for oncoming traffic—there is none. There are still no pedestrians, either. Despite the years separating my journeys to this place I manage to retrace the route we took with no difficulty. I can see a smattering of houses to the north. Sunset Hill. I notice those houses do not look as decrepit as the ones on Easton Avenue, and I feel a little better. Maybe the foreboding impression of decay was only in my head after all.

Then I reach the low wall of Kingsland Cemetery, and despite having the advantage of several inches over my younger self its hedgerows look every bit as imposing as they had that day. Here I deviate for my previous path and follow the wall until I reach the cemetery gates. There I stop. The gates are closed but not locked, and looking through them I see the graveyard is every bit as still and empty as it had been that day. “Peaceful,” my mother had called it. I would have said lifeless.

Just like this entire section of town.

I can’t do it—I can’t bring myself to go back in there. I know that worse is still to come, and that it might serve me well defy my fear and fortify my nerve. That this soulless place is just a precursor to the true horror I encountered that day and must confront on this one. But still I can’t go in there.

So I turn away and walk on, deciding to take the long route around the cemetery, and I hope my nerve holds long enough for me to do what I came here to do.

*          *          *

Standing amongst the unkempt grass on the northern slope of the Fields, I was on the verge of full-blown hysteria. I looked back and saw nothing following me, but whatever it was that Elly had seen could’ve been anywhere by now. I started to sob quietly, and I knew I would draw attention to myself but I couldn’t help it. I knew this was going to happen! I’d dreamed it Saturday night and now it had come true. My friends were gone, and soon I would join them in that dark, cold place.

Unless I got out of the Fields quickly.

But how? I couldn’t go back through the cemetery, but the only other options were to follow its outer wall until I came out at the very edge of Cranford or walk two miles south to Abbeyville. Two miles through wide, open fields surrounded by distant woods. It was a terrifying prospect, but I knew the further I got from that cemetery the happier I’d feel, so Abbeyville it was.

I started walking, keeping my eyes forward and moving at a hurried pace, and soon the tall grass gave way to scraggly greens carpeting low hills. I made my way between those hills, staying well clear of the thick, irregular thickets of trees that dotted the Fields, deliberately averting my eyes from them. Those were the same thickets I’d gleefully explored with my friends many times, and these were the same hills I’d ran through with Nobby, my loyal Labrador cross who I worried I might never see again. I suddenly wished I had brought him with me. He would have provided absolutely no protection, and probably would have bolted at the first sign of danger, but he would have company at least. The Fields where I’d spent so much of my young life, that had been a source of countless hours of care-free adventuring, had abruptly transformed into a remote, exposed and horribly threatening place. I knew that whatever had been terrifying enough to cause my friends to turn and run, and stealthy to take them without eliciting so much as a single cry for help, would have no trouble spotting and overpowering my plump, defenceless frame.

I found myself thinking about Micky Wilcox, about what his body must’ve looked like when they found him, and about the stories of moving furniture in the cellar of his murderer’s shop. About the vision my Mum had seen during said murderer’s trial. I wondered whether he’d really come to say goodbye, as that weird old woman had claimed, or if he’d actually come to warn her about what would someday happen to her own son. I thought of my Mum and fought back tears.

Somewhere to my left, I heard the swishing of foliage.

I went rigid, listening. There was a small grove of trees quite close by in that direction, and while I’d kept as far away from it as I could I knew I’d be visible to anything lurking within. I heard the faint whistle of cool air in my ears, and the distant sound of traffic. But no more rustling. I wondered if it was just the breeze, or maybe a fox—I knew there were foxes living out here, and badgers, too. But I couldn’t bring myself to look and see, and I was too scared to move. So I stood quietly for while, waiting, wondering. Seeing if I could sense that formless presence from the cemetery.

Nothing happened.

Finally I plucked up the courage to start moving again slowly, testing to see if whatever it was I’d heard would react. It didn’t, so I upped my pace slightly. Then a bit more. And as I put some distance between myself and that particular stand of trees I started to relax. The Fields sloped gently as I continued south, following the contour of Easton Avenue. The only sound I heard was the soft crunch of grass under my feet, and I’d almost convinced myself that the rustling really had been nothing more than the air flowing through the branches.

Then I heard it again.

Again I froze. It had been fainter than last time but I’d definitely heard it, coming from the same direction, and I knew no breeze had caused it this time. It had not come from a fox or a badger or any other natural source, either. It was the thing from the cemetery, it had to be, and it was following me. Playing with me.

Stalking me.

Then I heard more rustling, only now it was coming from a grove of trees on my right. I almost turned to look out of sheer surprise—it had somehow moved across the Fields without drawing my attention, without making a sound. Except when it wanted to.

And it was getting closer.

Then I heard another sound, the clear cracking of twigs underfoot, and I started to run again, as fast as I could, and I knew it wasn’t nearly fast enough, because if my friends couldn’t outrun that thing what chance did I have? I was slowing down too, I still hadn’t recovered from that flight through the cemetery. I was too bloody fat, too fat and useless, but soon it wouldn’t matter because I would be gone, just like my friends. I was so panic-stricken I wasn’t paying attention to where I was running, and my foot landed on a pine cone or something and I slid and tumbled sideways to the floor, landing on my left arm with a heavy thud. I rolled over, heaving strangled cries as I struggled to stand, and I managed to get up but nearly fell straight back down again, and I’d just steadied myself enough to attempt running again when I heard a voice calling, “Kev, where’re you going?”

I stopped mid-stride, unbelieving, but when I looked behind me there were my friends standing unharmed a few yards away, just to the side of some trees where they’d obviously been hiding, actually smiling at me. They’d been following me the whole time!

This was nothing but a sick joke!

“You, you sod, Elly!” I tried to scream at him, but it came out as more of a wheeze. Ian and Ricky creased up laughing, laughing at the terror they’d just put me through! And Elly, my best friend Elly was laughing with them!

“Sorry, Kev! It was just a joke!”

I’d never felt such humiliation and seething hatred in my life. I started walking back the way I came, striding right past them without so much as a glance, and I was so mad I was sweating. I’d had enough of my so-called friends—I was going home. I heard Elly calling after me, “Oh, Kev, come on! It was just a joke! Kevin, come back!”

“No!” I yelled without looking back. I didn’t want to look at them, I hoped I never saw any of them again. They all deserved to die out here.

But then Elly came running up to me, and I tried to keep going but he blocked my path. “Kevin, I’m sorry, OK? We were just messing you about. We won’t do it again, I promise.”

“Yeah, come on!” Ricky said as he jogged over to join us.

I didn’t know what to do. They both looked genuinely sorry, though I could still hear Ian sniggering behind me, and Elly shouted at him to shut up. I wanted to beat their brains in for what they’d just done, but I could see they felt guilty. “Come on, Kev. Please?” Elly said.

I stared at him hard, taking my time just to make him squirm. Then finally I said, “OK.”

Elly grinned broadly, and my anger lessened somewhat. Looking back, I wish I’d said no and kept going. Maybe they would have followed me back home and we all would have survived. Then again, they might just have gone on without me and I would never have known what happened to them.

Frankly, either of those options would have been better than seeing what I did.

Chapter III Chapter V

Creative Commons Licence
The Treehouse by Jake Kale is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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3 thoughts on “The Treehouse – Chapter IV

  1. This was the point where what was supposed to be a five-part story became a six-part story. My thinking was too much of a good thing is good for you, though I think I might have got that wrong. Still, good or bad, I’m probably covered!

    Chapter V next Tuesday (is it just me, or was the preceding line uncomfortable reminiscent of a certain abbreviation?).

    Jake

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